Jul 282016
 

Frederik Georg Frederiksen and Boline Jørgine Olsen

Frederik Georg Frederiksen

Frederik Georg Frederiksen (ca. 1892) - In uniform while enlisted in the Danish Military (photo courtesy of Rod Frederiksen) Attached are files for 1 Restoration. Restore photo. Do Not alter the faces. Remove any Border. make photo 5x7 @ 300dpi. Save As Jpeg - 11 Deadline is 1-11-2016

Frederik Georg Frederiksen (ca. 1893) – In uniform while enlisted in the Danish Military (photo courtesy of Rod Frederiksen)

Frederik Georg “George” Frederiksen was born August 28, 1874 in Høsterkøb, Frederiksborg, Denmark to Christen Frederiksen and Ane Lisbeth Jørgensen.  He was the second of six children born to Christen and Ane.  On August 16, 1882,  George’s mother died, leaving Christen a widower with six children, the youngest, Edvard Vilhelm, being just over a month old.  The loss of George’s mother resulted in the older boys being sent away to work.  The three oldest are in the 1890 Danish census with their household position listed as ‘tjenestetyende dreng,’ which loosely translates to ‘service servant boy,’ in English.  Older brother Jørgen Pedar is shown living/working for the Christoffer Jensen family, in Sandbjerg, George is shown at the widow Marie Johanne Helene Lund’s farm, in Høsterkøb; the youngest of the three, Thorvald is with the Ole Andreasen family, in Høsterkøb.  The three youngest children were living with Christen and his 2nd wife, Marie Jensine Pedersen, in Høsterkøb.  Little more is known about George’s childhood and life during this time.

According to the Danish Constitution all physically fit men over the age of eighteen are required to serve one year in the Danish Military.  The photo on the left is George, during his time of military service, the date is probably between 1892 and 1893; he would have been eighteen in August of 1892.

Frederiksen_Boline_Olsen-1898

Boline Jørgine Olsen (undated) – (photo courtesy Rod Frederiksen)

Boline Jørgine Olsen

Boline Jørgine Olsen was born May 13, 1871 in Trinitatis, København, Denmark to Morten Olsen and Ane Marie Andersdatter.  She was the fifth of six children born to Morten and Ane.  Her father was born in Sandjberg and her mother, Høsterkøb.  Morten died when she a small child but unlike George, the family remained intact.  Very little information is known, at this time, about Jørgine’s childhood.  However,  Jørgine’s family ties to the United States would be the catalyst for the Frederiksen’s departure from Denmark and settlement in the Cavendish-Teakean area of Idaho. Continue reading »

Jul 142016
 

During his lifetime John Paxon “Jack” Harlan’s career involved being a miner, merchant, farmer, trapper, teacher, soldier, historian, public servant, civic leader, timber cruiser, coroner et al.  Following is a brief synopsis of his life:

John Paxon Harlan

John P. Harlan with children l-r: Stila Myrtle, Eda Belle and George Washington (ca. 1913) on the boardwalk at Pierce City, Idaho

John P. Harlan with his children l-r: Stila Myrtle, Eda Belle and George Washington (ca. 1913) on the boardwalk at Pierce City, Idaho

John “Jack” Paxon Harlan was born on February 9, 1866 in Guthrie County, Iowa to George Washington and Emma Webster (Brown) Harlan, the seventh of ten children.  His father was a descendant of Michael Harland, who came to America in 1687, with William Penn and settled in Chester County, Pennsylvania.   Jack’s parents were married in 1849 at Lancaster County, Pennsylvania and remained there until the 1857.  In the Spring of  1857 Jack’s parents, along with his maternal grandparents relocated to Guthrie County, Iowa.  The family would remain in Guthrie County until 1879, when they moved to Lake County Colorado.

Wild Times in Leadville ‘The Silver City’

Leadville Colorado was incorporated in January of 1878 and soon Leadville had the reputation as one of the most lawless towns in the West.   In 1879 a large vein of silver was discovered at Leadville and the boom started in earnest, which would last until 1893.

It is unknown if George and Emma were aware of the town’s reputation when they decided to pack up their large family and head West.  I cannot imagine what a culture shock it must have been for Jack’s mother, Emma.  Emma was a deeply religious woman, who adhered to her Quaker beliefs and was actively involved in the Temperance Movement.  However, this experience must have been a great adventure for young Jack, who was just coming into his own.  The Harlan family quickly became a prominent family in the region, Jack’s father George would become a Justice of the Peace, in Leadville. Jack completed his studies at Central School and then attended college at the University of Colorado, where he studied law.  He returned to the area and was taught the skill of assaying, under the guidance of Clarence Hersey and would eventually become the assayer of the Montezuma mine, in Pitkin County.  Jack left Colorado in 1889 and according to his biography, published in 1914, he traveled for many years:

“He was a resident of Leadville until 1889 when he began to travel, following mining operations for many years in Arizona, New Mexico, California, Western Washington and British Columbia.–(Source) History of Idaho, A Narrative Account of Its Historical Progress, Its People and Its Principal Interests (Vol. 2) – Hiram T. French, M. S.

Continue reading »