May 282018
 

Since I began this website, a couple of years ago, I have done a Memorial Day post to remember those who made the ultimate sacrifice.  The first post covered the Civil War, last year I covered WWI and this year will be WWII.  Because this website focuses on the Cavendish-Teakean area, this post will cover those most closely connected with this area. Following are brief biographies of five young men who made the ultimate sacrifice, for their country, in WWII:

Lieutenant Russell Alanson Betts
February 17, 1911 – April 29, 1942
Sergeant Henry Oscar Wittman
August 5, 1915 – August 29, 1943
Lieutenant Bernard Francis Armstrong
December 13, 1920 – May 5, 1944
Private Oscar Wayne Lind
March 3, 1922 – November 14, 1944
Sergeant Earl Chester McIver
August 24, 1924 – April 30, 1945

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May 292017
 

Postcard – World War I

The six names listed below are the young men from, or with connections to,  the Clearwater Valley.  These men made the ultimate sacrifice for their country in “The Great War.” I hope you will take a moment to reflect on the lives lived and sacrificed, for God and Country, as we honor the fallen this weekend.

Private Charles Swinton Hunt Rennison
November 30, 1878 – September 18, 1917
Lieutenant Harold Everett Kinne
February 28, 1896 – July 19, 1918
Private Alton Bellomy
June 1, 1892 – July 26, 1918
Private Charles Augustus Bobbitt
October 11, 1893 – October 6, 1918
Private Glenn Royal Dieterle
February 17, 1891 – October 11, 1918
Private Bernard Smith Armstrong
October 17, 1893 – November 6, 1918

While researching the Cavendish Cemetery and putting together the community ties and relationships of those buried there, I came across the stone of Bernard S. Armstrong.  In researching Bernard, I discovered he was a casualty of WWI and thought it appropriate to write something about his life and the lives of the five men, with ties to Clearwater County, as we honor the memories of the fallen, this Memorial Day. Continue reading »

Oct 232016
 
Newspaper Stories - Walter Stiles

Newspaper Stories – Walter Stiles

When my Grandmother Stila M. (Harlan) Gleason passed away on May 7, 2002, not only did we lose the family matriarch but we lost the our family historian.  I had been dabbling with the family tree for a couple of years and but hadn’t really delved into researching and documenting the life stories of individuals.  I decided someone should document our family’s history to preserve it for future generations and so began my adventurous  journey, as an amateur genealogist, the search for Uncle Walter Stiles and the discovery of an interesting life.

Walter Stiles

Walter Stiles was born in Chicago, Illinois, in October of 1867, the second child and son of George Washington and Mary Jane (Cunningham) Stiles.   Walter’s father was born in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia and his mother in New York.

George W. Stiles - Moves West - Abilene Weekly Reflector, December 5, 1889

George W. Stiles – Moves West – Abilene Weekly Reflector, December 5, 1889

The family remained in Illinois until the late 1870s and then headed West to Dickinson County, Kansas.  The family would remain in Dickinson County until 1889, when George Sr. headed west to Washington and Idaho.  The family, including wife Mary, along with Walter, Albert and daughter Emma, would soon follow.  Oldest son George Jr., remained in Kansas, until 1891.  The family had settled in Idaho; when George Jr. and his family joined them.

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Aug 212016
 

Following is a post about a very special person, who is a big part of my childhood memories of ‘The Hill.’   Olive (Herring) Preussler is not a blood relation to my family but I called her Grandma.  I don’t know how many of the other kids in Cavendish-Teakean called her Grandma, perhaps everyone did or maybe it was just me, here is her story:

Olive Vada Herring

Preussler Family - (l-r) Melvin, Olive, David (baby), Marilyn and Marie, Merton standing (ca. 1944)

Preussler Family – (l-r) Melvin, Olive, David (baby), Marilyn and Marie, Merton standing (ca. 1945) photo courtesy Alan Sewell

Olive Vada Herring was born March 25, 1914 at Teakean, Clearwater County, Idaho. She was the fourth of five children born to Orville E. and Carrie (Heltzel) Herring, both of her parents were members of the German Baptist Brethren Church.   Her father’s family came west, from Iowa, and settled in Teakean in 1889.  Her mother’s family came west to Idaho and arrived from Astoria, Illinois in June of 1903.

Dunkard Colonists

P. E. Stookey went to the junction yesterday to meet his brother, Sherman Stookey, who with his family arrived from Plymouth, Illinois, to make a permanent residence in the Potlatch.  Rev. Sherman Stookey is a Dunkard preacher and he is accompanied on this trip by five families of his church people, twenty persons all told, who have come to make a settlement in the Potlatch section.  Friends and relatives have been here for some time and have reported favorably on this section.  Other families will follow in the course of the year to strengthen the colony.–(Source) The Lewiston Teller, March 6, 1903

P. E. Stookey, along with his brother Reed and John Q. Holladay had settled in the Cavendish-Teakean area in 1889.  I believe the article below should read twenty people, not twenty families based on the earlier article.

Colony of Dunkards for Idaho.

A large colony of Dunkards will arrive in a few days from Astoria, Illinois, and take up their abode near Cavendish.  Last spring twenty families arrived from Illinois and they have prevailed upon their friends to follow.  They are a thrifty industrious people and will make good citizens.  Such emigration should be encouraged.  They will bring with them money and show taste to improving their farms. —(Source) The Lewiston Teller, June 19, 1903

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Aug 072016
 

A special thanks to Dennis Roth, for providing all of his information regarding the burials at Teakean Cemetery and taking the time to provide insight, direction and avenues of research.  Without his help and the help of others, I would not have been able to compile this information and hopefully help some of the folks, who have family connections to the early pioneer families of Cavendish-Teakean. 

My ‘LITTLE’ Project

Teakean Cemetery - Satellite View (Google Maps)

Teakean Cemetery – Satellite View (Google Maps)

In September of 2011 I got an idea to add a memorial for Grandma Preussler, on Find-A-Grave and from that idea sprang a “little project” that would take me nearly five years to complete.  Grandma Preussler is Olive V. (Herring) Preussler, she is not my grandmother by blood.  However, I have always called her grandma and she was a very important person in my life, growing up and someone who I adored.  I wanted to make sure her memory was preserved and thought a virtual memorial would be a great avenue to accomplish this goal.  I did some researching and found her grandson Alan Sewell and contacted him and explained what I wanted to do and why.  By happenstance, he had just been to the Teakean Cemetery and had taken a bunch of photographs of the gravestones, which he sent to me.  I created memorials online for everyone and uploaded the photographs over a weekend.  This gave me a great sense of accomplishment, which lasted about a week.  I knew there were many unaccounted for burials at Teakean and I soon became determined, perhaps obsessed, with documenting everyone at rest there. Continue reading »