Sep 172016
 

Patriotism is one of the noblest and loftiest emotions of the heart, it should be along with our religion and our homes the first best thought.  Where would be today our happy homes, if it was not for this strong government, whose beneficent laws, like the all pervading sunlight, are above and around us everywhere?  Go where we will, all over this land, the same flag protects us.  Laws not made by tyrant hands, “but by the people, of the people, and for the people.”  Laws that if they ever perish, woe be to us in that day and hour…  We are not yet out of the breakers.  The astute leaders.. and the people they control; love the memory of their fallen institutions.  They believe they were born to rule, they care nothing for the semblance of a ruler, so they in reality rale, and will never rest until they have gained by the ballot what they have lost by the sword.

Emma Webster (Brown) Harlan, July 2, 1886

Emma Webster Brown

Emma Webster (Brown) Harlan - (ca. 1900) (Chester County Historical Society - Photo Archives)

Emma Webster (Brown) Harlan – (ca. 1900) (Chester County Historical Society – Photo Archives)

Emma Webster Brown was the first child and only daughter born to Elwood and Hannah (Webster) Brown, in Cecil County, Maryland, on April 8, 1832.  Emma’s mother, Hannah Webster, was a descendant of some of the earliest settlers in America, arriving in the 1600s.  There are documents indicating Emma’s mother was a direct descendant of William Webster, who came to America, from Scotland in 1685 and settled in Woodbridge, New Jersey.

The Webster family left New Jersey, due to the religious persecution of Quakers and first settled in Abington, Montgomery County, PA  prior to them eventually settling in Chester and Lancaster Counties, Pennsylvania.

Shortly after Emma’s birth, Elwood and Hannah returned to Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, where Emma’s seven brothers were born.  The family would remain in Pennsylvania until the late 1850s.

Marriage

On April 26, 1849, Emma married George Washington Harlan.  George was the 2nd child and son born to Jonathan and Elizabeth (Thompson) Harlan.  George was a 3x great-grandson of Michael Harland, one of Harland brothers who arrived at William Penn’s Colony at New Castle, Delaware in 1687.  The brothers, were Quakers who emigrated from England and Ireland to seek freedom from persecution for their religious beliefs.

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Aug 212016
 

Following is a post about a very special person, who is a big part of my childhood memories of ‘The Hill.’   Olive (Herring) Preussler is not a blood relation to my family but I called her Grandma.  I don’t know how many of the other kids in Cavendish-Teakean called her Grandma, perhaps everyone did or maybe it was just me, here is her story:

Olive Vada Herring

Preussler Family - (l-r) Melvin, Olive, David (baby), Marilyn and Marie, Merton standing (ca. 1944)

Preussler Family – (l-r) Melvin, Olive, David (baby), Marilyn and Marie, Merton standing (ca. 1945) photo courtesy Alan Sewell

Olive Vada Herring was born March 25, 1914 at Teakean, Clearwater County, Idaho. She was the fourth of five children born to Orville E. and Carrie (Heltzel) Herring, both of her parents were members of the German Baptist Brethren Church.   Her father’s family came west, from Iowa, and settled in Teakean in 1889.  Her mother’s family came west to Idaho and arrived from Astoria, Illinois in June of 1903.

Dunkard Colonists

P. E. Stookey went to the junction yesterday to meet his brother, Sherman Stookey, who with his family arrived from Plymouth, Illinois, to make a permanent residence in the Potlatch.  Rev. Sherman Stookey is a Dunkard preacher and he is accompanied on this trip by five families of his church people, twenty persons all told, who have come to make a settlement in the Potlatch section.  Friends and relatives have been here for some time and have reported favorably on this section.  Other families will follow in the course of the year to strengthen the colony.–(Source) The Lewiston Teller, March 6, 1903

P. E. Stookey, along with his brother Reed and John Q. Holladay had settled in the Cavendish-Teakean area in 1889.  I believe the article below should read twenty people, not twenty families based on the earlier article.

Colony of Dunkards for Idaho.

A large colony of Dunkards will arrive in a few days from Astoria, Illinois, and take up their abode near Cavendish.  Last spring twenty families arrived from Illinois and they have prevailed upon their friends to follow.  They are a thrifty industrious people and will make good citizens.  Such emigration should be encouraged.  They will bring with them money and show taste to improving their farms. —(Source) The Lewiston Teller, June 19, 1903

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May 302016
 

American_Flag_-_Half_StaffBackground:  This is part of the Brown line that originated in Maryland and Pennsylvania. This family has ties to the Webster’s and Harlan’s of Lancaster County. 

This family line has many branches that continued their journey West, some as far as California.

The soldiers mentioned in this post are not the only family members who served, nor are they the only family members who made the ultimate sacrifice for their country.  I will continue to recognize and post about the heroes in my family, as information becomes available and time permits.

Sgt. Webster, Capt. Howard, Pvt. Francis Fell, Sgt. Wilmer and Capt. Albert Webster Brown

The names listed above are five brothers who stepped forward and served their country during the Civil War, of these five only Albert would live to old age.  This post is dedicated to their memory and to their sacrifices. Continue reading »

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